einkorn flatbread and hummus

Soaked Einkorn Flatbread and Hummus

Posted May 17, 2016 by Julie Koyle

Servings

20-25 servings

Ingredients

    Flatbread

    • 3/4 cup Kefir Or Plain Yogurt
    • 5+ cups Einkorn Flour
    • 1/4 cup Butter Softened
    • 1/2 cup Warm Water
    • 1 1/2 teaspoons Real Salt
    • 1/2 teaspoon Baking Powder

    Hummus

    • 2 cups Cooked Garbonzo Beans No liquid
    • 1 clove Garlic Medium Sized
    • 1 tablespoon Cumin
    • 1/2 cup Water
    • 1/4 cup Olive Oil
    • 1 1/2 teaspoons Real Salt
    • 1/3 cup Sesame Seeds If you do not have a high power blender, use 2 Tbsp of Tahini insead
    • 2 tablespoons Lemon Juice

    Directions

    Flat Bread

    1. Mix 2 1/2 cups of flour with the rest of the dry ingredients.

    2. Add wet ingredients and mix again.

    3. Add remainder of flour until pulls away from the sides of the bowl. It may be more or less than the recipe calls for depending on the density of your flour.

    4. Cover with a folded towel and leave for 8 hours. This dough can also be used immediately. However, allowing it to soak breaks down the phytic acid and makes if better for you and easier to digest but if you don’t have time, this step can be skipped.

    soaked einkorn flatbread dough

     

     

     

     

     

    5. Shape with palms into thin circles about 4″ in diameter. (You can also roll them out and cut them if it’s easier.

    6. Fry on griddle (we use cast iron). They can be fried with or without oil depending on the desired texture.

    This dough can be stored in the refrigerator and used for several days.

    Hummus

    1. Blend all ingredients together until smooth. Water can be added by the tablespoon if it’s too thick for the blender, but careful not to make it too thin.

     

    15 thoughts on “Soaked Einkorn Flatbread and Hummus

      1. Admin

        Allison, I apologize for the confusion. One half of a cube of butter is 1/4 of a cup. I will add that to recipe.

        Reply
    1. Kelly

      What is the measurement of 1/2 cube of butter? Can’t wait to try this! Could you freeze the flat bread too?

      Reply
      1. Admin

        Kelly, 1/2 a cube of butter is 1/4 cup. I apologize if that wasn’t clear. And yes, after the flat bread is baked it can be frozen.

        Reply
    2. Dee

      Is 8 hours the max time for fermenting? What would happen if one were to ferment for 12 or even 16 hours?

      Reply
      1. Admin

        Dee, 8 hours is not necessarily the max. It would be fine to soak it longer. It’s possible that the flavor might be a little stronger if you do that, but it shouldn’t be a problem.

        Reply
    3. Karen Bechard

      I made this recipe tonight but there is no way I could incorporate another 2 1/2 cups of flour. I do not have a mixer with a dough hook so had to mix this by hand. That may have been the reason I couldn’t add but 1 1/2 more cups of flour. I hope this turns out ok when I cook it tomorrow morning.

      Reply
      1. Admin

        Karen, you’re wise to pay more attention to consistency than exact measurements. You just never know how the density of your flour or other factors may affect it. I hope the final product works out for you!

        Reply
      1. Admin

        Sharon, we have never thought to create a recipe like that, but you can use this one with a couple changes. You can substitute coconut milk for the kefir. Obviously, with this change, you won’t need to leave it because it won’t be a soaked bread anymore, but it will still work. And you can just remove the oil and salt, but you will need to watch consistency and may need to add a little extra liquid. I don’t know if it’s all fat you’re trying to avoid or just added oil. Coconut milk has some fat but I’m not sure how you’d make it work without it unless you just mixed some flour and water and fried it.

        Reply
    4. Paula

      This is a wonderful recipe! I’ve made it five times now and am very happy with the results:)
      I freshly grind the flour, (I begin with the lesser amount of flour, as suggested), then add flour until the dough is well formed but not stiff. I leave it overnight (8-10 hours), and there it is in the morning, ready for anything.

      Some notes;
      After the dough is mixed, put it in an oiled bowl, turn the dough over to cover the top with oil,…this dough oxidizes after a few hours (turning very dark on exposed surfaces), so covering it with the oil and then covering with plastic wrap (pressed onto the dough with edges well sealed) reduces this.

      This dough can be used to make focaccia and pizza. I stretch it thin, then cook in a hot skillet on both sides until done. Then, for focaccia , I sprinkle with sea salt; for pizza, I add toppings, then broil. It’s also great for breakfast with cream cheese and jam…

      Thank you for a great recipe!

      Reply

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