Basic White Einkorn Yeast Bread

Posted March 2, 2016 by Julie Koyle
All you need for light, and fluffy sandwich bread using our einkorn all-purpose flour!

Posted in :, Cuisines :

Servings

2-3 Loaves

Ingredients

  • 12 cups Einkorn All Purpose Flour Approximate
  • 1/3 cup Honey
  • 1/3 cup Avocado Oil
  • 3 cups Very hot tap water
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons Yeast
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons Real Salt

Directions

1. Mix oil, honey, water, and 4 cups of einkorn all-purpose flour.

2. Add yeast, and 1/2 a cup of flour. Mix.

3. Add salt. Add flour a little at a time while mixing. Keep adding flour until it cleans the sides of the bowl (We added about 7 cups).

4. Knead in mixer for 10 minutes.

5. Let rest in bowl for 20 minutes. If dough is a little sticky, sprinkle about 1/2 cup of flour on top while resting.

6. Knead a couple times on floured surface. Shape into loaves (2 or 3 depending on desired size. If you choose to do 2, you will probably have a little dough left over. We made mini cinnamon rolls!).

7. Place loaves into greased loaf pans. Place in warm place (we used oven off) and let rise until doubled.

DSC01024

Before Rising

DSC01029

After Rising

 

 

 

 

 

7. Bake at 350º for 30 minutes. Remove from oven and brush with butter. Let cool a little before slicing.

DSC01033

Fresh out of the Oven

DSC01045

Ready to Eat

83 thoughts on “Basic White Einkorn Yeast Bread

        1. Admin

          We haven’t noticed much of an overmixing problem with this recipe so I definitely wouldn’t overthink it. Once it has pulled away from the sides of the bowl, just let it mix in the kitchenaid for 10 minutes and that should be fine. If it were overmixed it may get sticky to the point of being unmanageable, but it’s not that temperamental. Overmixing shouldn’t be a problem if the directions are followed.

          Reply
      1. Debbie T.

        Recipe says: 4. Knead in mixer for 10 minutes.
        I have a WonderMix mixer (similar to your Bosch). Would I still mix it for 10 minutes?
        Thanks!

        Reply
  1. Sylvana

    hello, I would like to use wild fresh yeast and make one loaf to start. Is it safe to cut the recipe in half?
    thanks

    Reply
    1. Admin

      Stephen, that should work just fine. Coconut oil may make it slightly different as far as consistency but it shouldn’t be a problem.

      Reply
    1. Admin

      Sandra, in the recipes where we do use yeast, we use saf-instant yeast. But we generally use natural leavening.

      Reply
  2. Jill

    Hi,

    First time baking with Einkorn so I want to halve the recipe. I will use half amount of ingredients but during step 2, do I still add 1/2 cup of flour or reduce to 1/4 cup? Also is the honey essential or only to sweeten? I ask because we are limiting sweeteners as well as gmo wheat.

    Thanks in advance!

    Reply
    1. Admin

      Jill, you would reduce the flour in that step as well if you were going to half the recipe. The honey is kind of important because the yeast needs something to feed on in order to grow. You could try reducing it. If you eliminate it all together, it will still probably work but will not rise as well.

      Reply
    2. Jim

      Modern wheat is hybridized, not GMO. There has never been any GMO wheat on the market anywhere in the world at this point in time.

      The honey is essential as it feeds the yeast and aids in the leavening process. It adds a better flavor to the bread than regular sugar would as well, so that’s a plus.

      Reply
      1. Bonnie

        It is not gmo that is the problem with modern wheat, it is the glyphosate from round up that is the problem. Wheat is genetically engineered to work with roundup. It also contains gluten.

        Reply
    1. Admin

      Karen, we’ve never tried that. It might work if you have a setting that can keep it from being over kneaded. We’d love to hear how it turns out.

      Reply
      1. Nora olaso

        Sorry I didn’t address you but I am not sure who I am talking to but what I want to ask is how much flour do you kneed in to the dough on the counted I am learning from beginning so I have read many recipes one said not to add much flour when youo kneed so I idid very little (kind of a dusting) but your recipe looks like the one I want to fallow but when youo say kneed a couple of time does that mean fold it over a couple times or does it mean kneed for three to five min it is not clear to me I thought it would help me if I knew how much flour I was kneeling in. Thank you so much for your help Nora olaso one of your costomers

        Reply
        1. Admin

          Hi Nora, just sprinkle the counter with a little flour and fold the dough a couple times. We don’t recommend overkneading einkorn dough. I hope that helps!

          Reply
  3. Debbie T.

    Looks fantastic! A couple questions:
    1. when you say you let rise in oven (off), do you leave the light on for added warmth?
    2. approx. how long should it take to double in size?
    3. what do you recommend for storing? how long does it keep? can I freeze one loaf–will it affect the bread?

    Thanks–just subscribed.

    Reply
    1. Admin

      Debbie, thanks for your great questions.

      1. Yes, you can (and we often do) leave the oven light on to add some warmth.
      2. To double in size, it varies depending on normal baking factors, but 1 to 2 hours is probably a safe bet.
      3. This bread behaves pretty much like any other homemade bread. At room temperature, a loaf would probably last up to a week, but it depends on the humidity of your climate and the temperature of your home, so just keep an eye on it. But yes, you can freeze it without significantly affecting the bread.

      Hope this helps!

      Reply
  4. Tammy

    In a comment on June 6, you mentioned you generally use natural leavening. Do you have a recipe for bread using that instead of packaged yeast?

    Thanks!

    P.S. Just found your site and subscribed. Looks like a lot of great info. 🙂

    Reply
    1. Admin

      Tammy, it’s true. We do prefer natural leavening for a variety of reasons. You can find our sourdough bread recipe here. Be aware that the sourdough recipe calls for whole grain flour and the yeast bread calls for all-purpose. Obviously, both flours will work in both recipes, but if you’re using all-purpose in the sourdough recipe, you may want to watch consistency and adjust a little.

      Reply
  5. David

    Just found your great site! I’ve been baking gluten-free for almost five years and want to give this ancient grain a go. We both are somewhat intolerant of gluten or more likely, the Glyphosate (roundup) residue therein – who would know? I understand a lot about “persnickety” dough mixes (batters) and would like a more “gluten-like performing” dough to make my baked goods. I understand that like GF baked goods, two or three days is about it before the staling process kicks in. But I’m sure that like GF goods, placing them into the freezer extends their life considerably.

    My question is: When you use the stand mixer for your bread batters, do you use the paddle or the hook attachment?? Thanks.

    Reply
    1. Admin

      David, yes, putting goods baked with einkorn flour in the freezer or refrigerator will extend their shelf life. We use a Bosch mixer. I don’t know what kind of mixer you use, but we use wire whisks for thin batters, a dough hook for breads and rolls, and paddles for really thick dough such as cookie dough.

      Reply
  6. Trish

    I just got my first order of Einkorn flour, and was so excited to try it out. When I did, it became obvious that this is quite different from what I am used to!
    I have been baking my own bread since the mid-60s, and doing things as I had always done did not work out well. So…questions.
    Do you not have to let the bread dough raise twice – I have always kneaded it and let it raise in the bowl, then punch it down, knead a little more, then form loaves in bread pans, and let it rise again. Well, I did this, and the bread rose great in the bowl, but the damp towel over the top of the bowl then stuck to the dough, so it punched itself down when I removed it. When I put it in the bread pans to rise again – it did, but not as much as I was used to, and when I baked it, it kind of sunk instead of making that nice dome. So..it was ugly bread, but it tasted wonderful! Took it for my family Thanksgiving dinner, and none of the loaves made it – they all got eaten beforehand! Have a couple of “gluten-sensitive” folk in the family – had them try it out to see if the bread bothered them. Haven’t heard yet, but everyone loved the taste and the texture, even tho the loaves were not tall as usual.

    Looking at your recipe for basic bread – understand the honey, but why the oil? I have never added oil to my bread, and wonder why it is here. Is it necessary? I’d rather leave it out (and did when I made the first batch).
    Your instructions just have the bread being mixed and then straight into the bread pans. Your instructions are using a bread mixer – another thing I have never done – mix by hand – knead by hand. So do I skip the ‘raising in the bowl’ part and just put it in pans?
    Temperature – you have 350 degrees – and what I have always done is bake 35 minutes at 365.
    Willing to adapt how I make bread – but just would like these things clarified – so next time I will have beautiful bread!

    Thanks much!
    Trish

    Reply
    1. Admin

      Trish, I’m glad that the bread tasted good. There is definitely a learning curve with einkorn and working with it is different. There are a lot of different ways einkorn bread could work and we’re not assuming this is the only way, but our bread has been beautiful using this recipe. Keeping all that in mind, I will answer your questions as best I can.

      Einkorn tends to be sticky. This is why there is oil in the recipe. It helps with that. If you don’t mind it without it, that’s fine.

      If you’ll look at step 5, it says to leave in the bowl for 20 minutes. That is the “First rising.” We recommend you not let it rise too long in the first rising because then when it gets into loaves it hasn’t exhausted it’s rising power.

      You can play around with temperature and time to see what you like the best. This is just what we did that worked well. I hope that helps and you get the hang of it soon! Best of luck!

      Reply
      1. Trish

        Thanks for the answers! Helps me a lot to know the ‘why’ behind the ingredients – going to try again, and do it the way you have it….see how it goes…got a bunch of family wanting some for Christmas dinner!!

        Reply
  7. Ted

    Apparently, I’ve already subscribed. I also do thefreshloaf.com for einkorn related recipes and jargon. Thank you for what you’re doing.

    Reply
  8. Lauri

    I do not have a stand mixer so I am doing this by hand. Could you adjust the instructions a little for someone doing the kneading by hand?
    Thanks!

    Reply
    1. Admin

      Hi Lauri, I would still knead it on the counter for 10 minutes. Then, I would put it in a bowl with a towel over it to let rest for 20 minutes.

      Reply
      1. Lauri

        Thank you Jennifer. I have made a lot of loaves – not a single recipe twice – until this one.
        I wanted a simple easy to do and remember recipe for sandwich bread. That’s it!
        Funny thing is, the first time I made a loaf of this recipe I got the kneading and resting phases mixed up! Bread didn’t care. Came out great except for sinking instead of doming.
        Any suggestions?

        Reply
          1. Admin

            Hi Lauri, as you probably know, there are a lot of factors in making a loaf of bread. This recipe is how we got it to work in our kitchen. However, where you live may be different. Generally when a loaf of bread sinks, it was left to rise too long. You may have done exactly what the recipe says, but for where you live, the rise time might be better shorter. If it peaks to early it will sink before it’s done baking, so I would start by reducing rise time.

  9. Lauri

    Thank you! I will try that. So touchy, too long, not long enough. ugh But I gotta get it right because I am not buying regular commercial wheat based products anymore.

    Reply
    1. Admin

      Hi Lauri, I get you! The learning curve can be tough, but you’ll get the hang of it. Because of the amount of factors involved, it’s hard to tell a person exactly how to make it work for their kitchen, but the more you play with it, the more you’ll figure out. You’re welcome to ask any questions you may have along the way.

      Reply
    1. Admin

      Hi Gayle, yes that is correct. This makes up to three loaves. If you’d prefer less, you can salt to your taste.

      Reply
  10. CEO Tim

    I recently bought a bag of einkorn flour
    We used it for several diferant type of bread as well as donoughts
    We replaced. Standard weat or white flour for einkorn
    We also replaced the standard bread yeast with chaplain yeast
    All of the replies came out perfectly

    That being said
    My 9 year old
    Who is gluten intolerant can now eat her favorite food again !!!!

    Reply
  11. Tish

    Hello,
    I have tried other einkorn bread recipes and the resulting loaf is very dry and crumbly. Are these loaves gernerally moist?
    Thanks
    Tish

    Reply
    1. Admin

      Hi Tish, our finished product was very moist, but of course it depends on how much flour you add. Some people tend to over flour einkorn recipes because einkorn tends to be sticky. And it’s ok if it’s a little sticky. The finished product can still be beautiful. Don’t just keep adding flour or the product will be dense and crumbly. Since einkorn takes longer to absorb liquid, sometimes if you leave it for a few minutes and come back, you’ll find you don’t need to add more flour.

      Reply
      1. Tish

        Thank you! I have made 3 loaves and they turned out perfectly! So excited to have found einkorn and your recipe!
        Thank you!!
        Tish

        Reply
  12. Carolee Radline

    After reading Wheat Belly Cookbook by Dr. William Davis, I understand all flours sold in grocery stores and all wheat products are responsible for all kinds of diseases and medical issues because the dinkel wheat has been scientifically tampered with. May I assume that Einkorn wheat has not? And there would be no cross contamination? I’ve had to eat gluten free for years, as have my son and daughter. Have you received any replies that indicate people with similar issues can eat bread from this flour?

    Reply
    1. Admin

      Hi Carolee, we have many customers with a wide range of gluten sensitivities who can eat einkorn with no problems. That’s one of the main things that attracts people to einkorn. If someone has full blown celiac disease, we recommend that they consult their doctor before trying einkorn.

      Reply
    2. Joyce

      Carolee, I have many food sensitivities, wheat being a huge one. I found out about Einkorn and was ecstatic!!! I have not had any problems whatsoever with Einkorn. I’ve since then told many people who have wheat and gluten issues about Einkorn. Not one of them has reacted to it.

      Reply
    1. Admin

      Hi Annet, I believe any yeast bread can be converted to sourdough, and you should be able to use jovial’s starter, but I do not know exactly how the recipe would be different and I can’t vouch for it, never having tried it. We do have a sourdough sandwich recipe here if that would be easier. Einkorn can be tolerated by people with a wide range of gluten sensitivities. However, we always recommend that those with full-blown celiac disease consult with a doctor before trying einkorn.

      Reply
  13. marxconwell

    Absolutely delicious! And your recipe was super easy to follow. My bread turned out beautiful and delicious the very first time! Now to make a cinnamon raison version, and those cinnamon rolls you mentioned above!

    Reply
  14. Pam Nader

    I noticed you let the bread rise in the oven. I have two questions. 1 do you preheat the oven a little in order to have it slightly warm in an electric oven? 2 when you are ready to bake the bread do you remove it from the oven while you preheat to 350 and then put it back in to bake?

    Reply
    1. Admin

      Hi Pam, this is not a necessity. If your house is cold, it might be a good idea. We just leave the light on. We don’t do anything else to warm it up. We also take the bread out before preheating the oven when we’re ready to bake.

      Reply
  15. Roy

    hi. iv been baking since 2013 and just strted with einkorn since Dec when i ordered some flour and berries from you guys..

    im wondering about the density of this bread when i use whole milled berries (i mill the berries) for my flour.. so far its been my experience that i get a dence bred thats very tasty but im looking for a fluffer in side if possable like this recipe..

    im also wondering about the difference of whole milled berrie flour vs the all purpose wheat flour and is their a way to substute between the 2 types in this recipe?

    Reply
    1. Admin

      Hi Roy, there is quite a learning curve when baking with einkorn and even we don’t get it right 100% of the time. A big factor is the amount of flour used. Einkorn tends to be sticky which leads bakers to add more flour than necessary in order to be able to work with it. We’ve learned that if you use less flour the final products turns out fluffier and less dense. It’s difficult to work with, but we just oil our hands and the counter. The whole grain einkorn flour is just the whole berries ground into flour with nothing added or removed. The all-purpose flour has had the bran and the germ removed (so, it’s basically a white flour). They can be used in the same recipes, but the amounts may vary. There are so many factors that it really just comes down to watching consistency and experimenting in your kitchen.

      Reply
    1. Admin

      Hi Sarah, yes, it will work in the recipe. The amount of flour may not be exactly the same, so you’ll just want to watch the consistency.

      Reply
  16. Lisa

    Probably a very basic question but I’m getting ready to make my first item with eikorn – basic white bread with the berries I just got. I was planning on just grinding them – will that be considered the same thing as “einkorn all-purpose”?

    Reply
    1. Admin

      Hi Lisa, It won’t be exactly the same since this recipe calls for all-purpose einkorn flour, but it can still be done and will be close to the same amount. You’ll just want to watch consistency.

      Reply
  17. Joan arruda

    Hi I’m new to this site and look forward to trying these recipes. Also, I’m new to baking with einkorn flour and have had some good and some not so good outcomes. Because of the long mixing time ( 10 minutes) ,I am wondering if a food processor will work. Thank you. Joan

    Reply
    1. Admin

      Hi Joan, I suppose it would depend on the size and power of your food processor. We use a bosch electric mixer. I’d recommend that or a kitchenaid. Those would probably be best.

      Reply
  18. livesimply

    Recipe says:
    3 cups Very hot tap water
    1 1/2 tablespoons Yeast
    What would the approx. water temp be? Usually for warm water I use about 110ºF
    What kind of yeast, instant or dry active?

    Thanks!

    Reply
    1. Admin

      Hi Brook, each 7.5lb bag of berries grinds to approximately 22.5 cups of flour. It depends on the recipe you’re using. No recipe’s flour amount is exact because it depends on a lot of factors, but that should give you an idea.

      Reply
  19. Rita

    This bread looks absolutely wonderful! What size bread pans do you use? There are so many sizes. Thank you so much for the recipe!

    Reply
  20. Lyland

    Hi – just to confirm what type of flour are you referring to as “All-Purpose Einkorn Flour” Is this a white flour with the germ and bran removed much like other process white flour?

    I just started milling Einkorn and I definitely want to keep the whole grain and not throw away the fiber and most nutritious components. Do you have a whole grain Einkorn recipe as well?

    Reply
    1. Admin

      Hi Lyland, yes this is referring to a white flour with the bran and the germ removed. You can use this recipe with whole grain flour, but the amount of flour may vary. You’ll just want to watch consistency. With einkorn bread, I tend to prefer the dough to be on the wetter side. It makes for softer bread. Just oil or wet your hands when working with it.

      Reply
  21. Beginner Baker

    We decided to pass on this recipe becuase it’s too risky to use 12 cups of einkorn flour just to try. If we or the kids don’t like the bread then that’s 12 cups down the drain. Einkorn is already expensive as it is. Do you have a recipe that uses about 4 cups of flour?

    Reply
  22. Cathy

    I bought two 7.5lb bags of einkorn and a grain mill to bring to the Caribbean. I spent my morning learning how to use the mill with one disaster, then I put too much einkorn in and clogged it up. But I had more than enough flour to make this. I made mistakes here also. Long time since making bread due to gluten issues, and this is very different. Anyway, I got 2 pretty decent loaves of bread and one sort of a french bread. A bit dense, but very tasty, and I am happy for my first experience. Lots to learn, and hoping I can tolerate this wheat! I really miss bread! Looking forward to more breads, deserts and more! Also, hoping the grains hold up well in our environment, or I will have to bake a lot!

    Reply
  23. Roberta

    I just read on your “what is einkorn flour” page not to use a stand mixer to make bread because gluten doesn’t need to be developed. But in the recipe comments it says to knead with a stand mixer. I’m confused. I don’t want to waste any of my wheat berries.

    Reply
    1. Admin

      Hi Roberta, We do use a stand mixer. I was not aware that we ever said not to. That post must be very old. The main thing with einkorn is you don’t want to overmix. Just mix until it comes together. You don’t need to knead it for several minutes like you do with wheat bread. I hope that helps.

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *